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Newsletter. Issue 2005-20. Oct. 01, 2005
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Newsline Canada

Canada needs more immigrants, plain and simple, and we need them to succeed.
Address by Prime Minister Paul Martin
September 20, 2005
Gatineau, Quebec
http://news.gc.ca/cfmx/view/en/index.jsp?articleid=170549  
Excerpt on Immigration
 

Immigration. In light of our history, our values, and our impending demographic challenge, Canada’s immigration policy, particularly as it relates to the selection, integration and regional distribution of new immigrants, is obviously of key importance.

Canada needs more immigrants, plain and simple, and we need them to succeed. Too often, today’s new Canadians, despite higher levels of education on average, are not achieving economic success as quickly as in previous generations. We will keep, indeed we must keep, our doors open to immigrants of all classes and refugees from around the world. But as the numbers increase we also must be more active in recruiting immigrants who meet Canada’s evolving needs – needs that are identified in consultation with provinces, communities and those in labour, business and academia.

At the same time, we need better social and economic integration of new Canadians, including language training, credentials upgrading and recognition. On this last point, we cannot allow entrenched interests to continue to block progress. And we need to get funding where it’s needed most, as was seen in our recent agreement to substantially increase financial support to provinces for immigrant settlement. Quite simply, our approach to immigration can and must be something that distinguishes Canada – a central component of the Canadian advantage.

The second new force shaping our future – and which we must prepare for now – is the realignment of global political and economic strength, and specifically the rise of China and India. Politically, the balance of power in the world will shift toward a new equilibrium in the coming years. Tensions could increase, and there will be pressure on our international organizations to reflect this sea change. Economically, China and India – and others in their wake, such as Brazil – are rapidly developing a vast new middle class. A brand new consumer society, two billion strong, is coming into being in the historical equivalent of a snap of the fingers. Consider that in 2004, as measured by purchasing power parity, the U.S. accounted for about 20% of the global economy with less than 5% of the world’s population. Together, China and India also accounted for almost 20% of the world’s economy, but with 40% of its population – so it’s clear where the growth potential lies.
 


China leading global power shift
From today’s Toronto Star
Sep. 23, 2005. 01:00 AM
 
On the basis of the latest news coming out of North Korea, it's not at all clear that when its government declared it was "committed to abandoning all nuclear weapons" that this meant that it was committed to abandoning these weapons.

The deal announced early last week was that North Korea would give up its nuclear weapons program in return for the U.S. giving it a light-water nuclear reactor to generate badly needed electric power.

A couple of days later, word came from Pyongyang that only after the U.S. handed over the reactor would North Korea dismantle its weapons' program. The response in Washington was, naturally, "nuts" and negotiations are back to zero.

One key aspect of the deal hasn't changed, though. The principal credit for it, and for a final deal assuming it happens, is due far less to the U.S. or to North Korea than to China.

The circumstances here are unusual. China is North Korea's only ally and shares a common border with it. At the same time, its exports to the U.S. are the key to its astounding economic success. So China has both a lot at stake and a lot to offer. What isn't unusual, though, is that China is becoming a global diplomatic player for the first time in its history.

Some of the elements of this same scenario are being played out a long way from China. This case involves Iran, also a potential nuclear power. Despite pressure from America, supported by the European Union, Iran refuses to give up its program to develop enriched uranium, which could be used in nuclear bombs.

A week ago, newly elected Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said at the U.N. that Iran was not going to yield to outside pressure.
 
China is one reason Iran is confident it can resist outside pressure. China could use its Security Council veto to protect Iran against U.N. sanctions. China's interest here is obvious and overwhelming: It needs Iran's oil.

But China isn't the only new international diplomatic player eager to stay in Iran's good books. India, which is following China up the path to economic superpower status, has exactly the same pragmatic interest in Iran's oil.
 
Iran itself, because of its oil, now has real diplomatic clout. Tehran has just bluntly warned the EU it will take into account countries' attitudes on the nuclear issue when awarding oil exploration and production contracts.

We are approaching a "tipping point" in international affairs. For more than 50 years, these have been run, essentially, by the victors of World War II, reinforced later by the principal losers of that conflict, Germany and Japan.

Their day isn't yet done. But it's beginning to move toward dusk. The key shift is toward Asia, away from Europe. Sheer size, when matched by economic power is a major cause.
 
The shift to Asia can be detected even when size isn't decisive. South Korea, medium-sized but a major economic success, is increasingly putting distance between itself and its long-time ally, America.

A parallel cause of the eastward shift of power and influence is the aging of most countries in Europe. Not that long ago, global diplomacy really meant European diplomacy. Today, the continent is tired (see Germany), although there are still some exceptions, such as Britain.

The odd country out is, of course, the United States. What is happening to the U.S. now is what The New York Times recently called a "new global dance card." America's new partners are, or are going to need to be, international newcomers like China and India — and, perhaps, since the U.S. also needs its oil, Iran.
 
Ever since the end of the Cold War, a quest has been on for a "new world order."
No one guessed, though, that it would take the form of Europe moving to the sidelines while its place at centre stage is filled by those parts of the world that Europe once colonized.

Sep. 24, 2005. 01:00 AM

 
New housing starts will continue to drop
Immigration patterns affect home-buying and renovations
VICKY SANDERSON
SPECIAL TO THE STAR

 
IImmigration trends will have a big influence on future house-buying and renovation patterns, analysts say.

Immigration has been rising since 2001 and today more newcomers are buying homes than renting, Bob Duggan, chief economist for the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, told a recent home improvement industry conference in Markham.

As well, these trends will affect the retail home improvement and renovation sectors, which are already experiencing tremendous growth, says industry analyst Albert Plant, another speaker at the conference. He predicts retailers will have to target these markets in order to remain competitive. Some stores already are.

Retail hardware giant Rona just opened a new store in Richmond, B.C., that features international signage. In the United States, Home Depot has launched a new colour palette called Colores Origenes in response to research on Hispanic consumers' renovation habits.

Overall, home ownership rates, trending upward since 2001, will keep climbing as strong consumer confidence and healthy economic conditions feed a robust housing market, Duggan said.

While he expects small increases in interest rates over the coming months, mortgage rates are still lower than they've been since the late 1950s.

 

Goa & Garbage Galore
Appeal from  Margaret Mascarenhas and Wendell Rodricks


Dear Friends of Goa,

The lack of waste management infrastructure for both hazardous and ordinary waste in Goa is  shocking, shameful and, quite simply, inexcusable.Successive Goa governments have yet to take the problem seriously, and it is now reaching crisis proportions even as the tourism department continues to lure unsuspecting tourists for the upcoming season. Ever since the wall at a dump in the village of Curca collapsed some days ago, spewing filth into the village,villagers have twigged onto the fact that the municipal garbage being dumped on plateaus, near water sources, and near residential areas is bad for them and refuse to allow the municipalities to continue with this irresponsible practice. Meanwhile, garbage continues to accumulate all over the state, secretly dumped into ravines and along highways in the dead of night. Much of it is hazarous.
 
There is no logical reason for the situation in which we find ourselves,particularly given the low density population of Goa. It is a situation is extremely dangerous to the health of the entire population as well as to visitors. If it continues, Goa will find itself in the position of Surat some years ago. Surat, if you recall, was so dirty that in 1994 it was struck with a Plague epidemic-a disease from the Dark Ages. The vector is usually rat fleas, and as we all know, where there is garbage, there are rats.

Other diseases that occur under such conditions, particularly when water sources are contaminiated, none of them pleasant: e-coli, viral hepatitis, cryptosporadiosis, giardia infection.These diseases do not discriminate between rich and poor. Even Ministers and their families can contract them.And perhaps that is what is required for the government to wake up. But since Goa cannot afford to wait for that to happen, it is imperative that we hold elected officials accountable right now. We do, after all have a medical doctor as Deputy CM, who also holds the Environment portfolio. He and the rest of the Goa Government need to get to work pronto.
 
We encourage all Goans and Goa-lovers to get together and take action to force the Goa government to take this issue seriously. Contact MLAs and ministers; write to the editors of newspapers; get on the internet and warn tourism operators who promote Goa of the garbage crisis, contact TV stations like the BBC, bombard the Goa Government website, meet the Governor. Get out there and speak up on behalf of Goa. We need your help.
 
Margaret Mascarenhas and Wendell Rodricks
 
Find out more:
Several
local NGOs and individuals are working on solutions to the problem and have presented these to successive Goa governments. If you are interested in finding out more about these solutions, the following contacts  will be useful:
 
1.Goa Desc Resource Centre Ph:2252660
Website:
www.goadesc.org Email:
Press Clippings on the web: http://www.goadesc.org/mem/
Contact person: Roland Martins
 
2. Goa Foundation

Contact person: Claude Alvares
 
3. Wendell Rodricks, Director, Greenworks:

 
4. Goa Environment Federation/ PMCA Contact person: Patricia Pinto
 
Tel 0832 2225493
 (developed model unit for city composting)
 
 5. Dean d'Cruz, (designed lowcost composting plant) Tel 0832 24098295

 Contacts for turning up the heat: there are 3 easy ways you can help:
 1. Please write to the editors
 
Outlook:

Tehelka:
Sunday Midday: http://web.mid-day.com/includes/about_us.htm
Hindustan Times:
The Week:
India Today:
Times of India:
IT Travel plus:
The Hindu:
Asian Age:
 
2. Contact the Goa Government;
http://goagovt.nic.in/admset.htm
 
3. Use net resources such as forum lists, groups, blogs to get the messageout.

Calangute Social 2000
By: Olavo Ferreira

The Calangute Social 2005 was held in Toronto Canada on 17th September. A large gathering of Calangute families and their guests attended at the  beautifully decorated Claireport Banquet Hall in Etobicoke where many village socials are held following Calangute's lead.
 
After a beautiful Mass led by Fr Martin, with a lively choir the villagers danced to the band 'Shade' who began the music with ballroom numbers and took us into the early hours with a full range of jive, blues and more. The famous saxophone player 'Oggie' joined the stage to lend even greater enjoyment for the crowd. Teenagers were also delighted with Toronto's renowned 'DJ Clinton' who kept them hopping and asking for more at every opportunity.
 
Dinner was an extravagant spread of delectable food and desserts buffet style preceded by fireworks courtesy of Claireport management. Staff were draped in gold and blue sarees which complimented the general tone of the evening at times reminding attendees of the glittering outdoor gatherings in Calangute.
 
During dinner, the 'Dazzle Sisters', two young ladies, took to the mike and sang a melody of famous Konkanim songs which quickly revived memories and sentiment among the crowd raising them to even greater heights of participation. This was followed by the President's, Mr Olav Ferreira's speech, in which he reflected on the love and emotional bond of villagers and the fact that our prosperity has not lessened the natural character of Calangute or it's villagers.
 
Raffles and door prizes were quickly distributed and the evening continued to a full floor of dancers enjoying the music of 'Shade' and 'DJ Clinton'. The evening was compered with flair by Mrs Pat Fernandes (previous President 2003) and decorations were provided by Charles D'Souza and family.

The 6th Annual CLR Social

By Uvy LopesImmigration trends will have a big influence on future house-buying and renovation patterns, analysts say.

Immigration has been rising since 2001 and today more newcomers are buying homes than renting, Bob Duggan, chief economist for the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, told a recent home improvement industry conference in Markham.

As well, these trends will affect the retail home improvement and renovation sectors, which are already experiencing tremendous growth, says industry analyst Albert Plant, another speaker at the conference. He predicts retailers will have to target these markets in order to remain competitive. Some stores already are.

Retail hardware giant Rona just opened a new store in Richmond, B.C., that features international signage. In the United States, Home Depot has launched a new colour palette called Colores Origenes in response to research on Hispanic consumers' renovation habits.

Overall, home ownership rates, trending upward since 2001, will keep climbing as strong consumer confidence and healthy economic conditions feed a robust housing market, Duggan said.

While he expects small increases in interest rates over the coming months, mortgage rates are still lower than they've been since the late 1950s.

 


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