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Newsletter. Issue 2008-07. March 29, 2008
 
 
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India News Clips

Tata to buy Jaguar, Land Rover for $US2.3b
Reuters | Thursday, 27 March 2008

ON THE BLOCK: India's Tata Motors has announced a $US2.3 billion deal to buy Jaguar and Land Rover from Ford Motor Co.

India's Tata Motors has announced a $US2.3 billion deal to buy Jaguar and Land Rover from Ford Motor Co, a transaction that gives the Indian automaker a line-up ranging from the world's cheapest car to some of its more expensive.

For Tata, which plans to launch the ultra-cheap $US2,500 ($NZ3135) Nano or "People's Car," the addition of the profitable Land Rover brand provides an edge against Indian rival Mahindra & Mahindra Ltd, which had also pursued a deal with Ford.

Ford, for its part, gets to shed the money-losing Jaguar brand and gains a cash infusion at a time when the US market is slumping and it is attempting to bounce back from combined losses of more than $US15 billion over the past two years.

The sale price is roughly 40 per cent of what Ford paid for the two brands. Ford acquired Jaguar for $US2.5 billion in 1989, but failed to turn the British nameplate into a higher-volume brand. Ford paid $US2.75 billion for Land Rover in 2000.

 

India Tops The Table For Migrant Remittances,
Which is the amount of money Indians working abroad send home.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/business/7305667.stm

In 2007, Indian workers sent back $27bn (£13.6bn), according to new figures from the World Bank. The other countries in the top five were China with $25.7bn, Mexico's $25bn, the Philippines at $17bn and France with $12.5bn. The top country from which money was sent was the US with $42bn in recorded outward flows.

It was followed by Saudi Arabia, Switzerland and Germany.

Global remittances from migrants are now three times as large as the flows of official government aid to developing countries. Total global remittances in 2007 were estimated by the World Bank to be $318bn of which $240bn went to people in developing countries.

"In many developing countries, remittances provide a life-line for the poor," said the World Bank's senior economist Dilip Ratha. "They are often an essential source of foreign exchange and a stabilising force for the economy in turbulent times."

 

Smart Homes Go Hot
http://infotech.indiatimes.com/Personal_Tech/Digital_Home/Smart_homes_go_hot/


NEW DELHI: Imagine being able to dim the lights according to your mood, put on some great music and cut off the world through remote-controlled curtains -- all without getting off your comfortable couch.

If there is one thing that a smart home spells, it is ultimate luxury -- the luxury of controlling your environment at the touch of a button.

Architects say that while smart homes are not particularly different in terms of design from other, more conventional homes, it is in the detailing that they differ. Of course, the comfort they provide is unmatched.

Architect Archana D'Souza of Kipa Architects says, “Smart homes offer high degree of convenience to the end user. For example an elevator coming down to the inside of your house or automatic sensors and controls provide extreme level of comfort to the end user.”

“More and more people are going in for such smart homes that encompass technically upgraded features like remote controlled curtains, time sensor lighting or automated security systems. A gadget-operated home can work at the fingertips of the end user; the house can be programmed in the way one would like it to behave when one enters the home. This is sheer luxury as you don't have to keep waiting. Things start to happen automatically as you would like them too."

www.tamilstar.com

 

Goan Beauty Rocks Tollywood
Mar 23, 2008, 18:50
www.tamilstar.com


Ileana D’cruz the slim Goan beauty who made her presence felt in the Mahesh Babu starrer Pokkiri (Telugu) is currently rocking the Tollywood. Like most of the stars, she too started her modeling career before she shifted gears to film acting. She was seen in more than five Telugu films with popular stars and is committed to two other films which are in the making. In Tamil, she was last seen in Kedi with Ravi Krishna and Tamanna where she played the docile love interest of the hero.

Currently reigning the Tollywood, Ileana commands the highest pay cheque there. She has been aspiring to build a house in Hyderabad and settle down there. Her long cherished dream has come true now with the actress buying a flat for Rs 1.75 crores. She has also planned to have a massive house warming ceremony where all the leading artists of the industry would be invited.

 

Aar-em Electronics lights up rural India
http://www.thaindian.com/newsportal/lifestyle/
March 24th, 2008 - 6:44 pm ICT by admin -


Pune, Mar 24 (ANI/Business Wire India): Aar-em Electronics Pvt. Ltd. a Pune based firm known for its champion brand of Uninterruptible Power Supplies (UPS) now has entered the field of providing uninterruptible light source for villages after sunset by providing them lights and other utilities powered by solar energy.

“Mohri” a village situated at 100 kms from Pune, having 27 houses and a population of 160 of which 75 are children today boasts of having electricity which has been provided by Aar-em Electronics Pvt. Ltd. Where once life practically came to a standstill at sundown are now abuzz with activities.

The solar-based devices have illuminated the villagers’ houses like never before-kerosene lamps are a thing of the past now. Even, infotainment is beamed to them through solar-powered television sets.

After a tiring day at office, when the better part of urban population retires to the comfort in their brightly lit living rooms and waits for a sumptious dinner being cooked in the kitchen, a larger part of rural India - is immersed in darkness As dusk descends, it is time for the rural woman to fix a kerosene lamp and poke some firewood into a fuming chulha to cook dinner.

While the lamp barely lights up the place, both the lamp and the chulha fill up the house with hazardous smoke, putting at risk the health of the woman and also her children whom she tries to attend to while cooking.

India has over 140 million rural homes. Out of this some 87 million still burn kerosene for lighting, which is dirty and dangerous. Each family at an average consumes between 10-15 liters of kerosene per month, which in turn generates 2.6 kgs of Carbon Dioxide. This adds to pollution of the environment and accelerates global warming.

Combining the sun’s energy with modern technology has now provided mankind with a solution that can electrify his home and ends in a better lifestyle. Aar-em tries all possible ways to increase the villager’s useful hours after sunset by providing them lights powered by solar energy successfully installed and commissioned at Mohri village.

Aar-em is offering a system which typically contains a roof-installed solar PV module, storage battery, charge controller, interior wiring, and switches and fixtures with the capacity to power two- low-wattage high power LED modules.

This arrangement will help the really stretched village housewife to perform her daily chores better, which includes her cooking, stitching, and managing the children.

LED bulbs last 10 times more than as compact fluorescents (CFL), and 50-100 times longer than typical incandescent lamp or bulbs in normal everyday use situations, therefore energy is saved in maintenance and replacement costs. Since LEDs do not have a filament, they are not damaged under circumstances when a regular incandescent bulb or CFL would be broken. LED’s do not cause any heat build-up, and are energy-saving as they use only a fraction of the wattage of incandescent bulbs. All this makes LEDs the best choice for use with alternative energy sources

A solar photovoltaic (PV) project can transform the lives of thousands of people living in poverty-stricken rural regions by providing several hours of uninterrupted lighting every night. Such programs have been successful in Algeria, China, Egypt, Ghana, Indonesia, and Mexico.


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